How we can use soil as a source of hope, life and economy

As long as our planet is in one piece — with water and an atmosphere — we earthlings have life and hope. We can turn around global warming. What makes this possible is our planetary soils; our planet’s true source of wealth.
Humanity currently burns huge quantities of fossil fuels, primarily to generate electricity, secondarily to transport goods and people. Burning fossil fuels generates carbon dioxide. Earth’s atmosphere can hold only a limited quantity of carbon dioxide before the carbon dioxide starts dissolving into the oceans and causing ocean acidification.

Consensus not easy, but the right thing to do

According to a recent news article, it appears the light bulb has gone on and change is afoot. Apparently, the makers of ordinance 15-29 — which intends to prevent all vehicles on all city-owned beaches in Homer — have realized that it is, in fact, true that a “prescriptive easement” to the west of Bishops Beach toward Anchor Point can’t be redacted.
As stated recently, this revelation is one that the first Beach Policy Task Force had in 2001.
I’d like to share a little history for the sake of clarity and continuity. Below is the introductory paragraph submitted with the “Beach Policy Task Force Results,” May of 2001.

Letters -Aug. 26

Stealing from neighbors not the ‘Alaska way’ Some time ago, there was a good article about Iceland — perhaps you read it also. They face similar issues as we do in Alaska, yet they discuss them openly through social conversations in media, theater and music. That impressed me. For eight years, I fished commercially, and […]

Letters – Aug. 19

No beach party I was on the first Beach Policy Task Force 14 years ago. As a result, I would like to share the thoughts below: We studied for more than a year and learned that Bishop’s Beach to the right (or west — heading toward Anchor Point) is a traditional road. Therefore, there is […]

Let’s make Alaska government work smarter

Ever had an old car start to break down?
Maybe the filters get clogged and the tires wear down and you find yourself burning money as your gas mileage deteriorates. The brake pads start to squeak, “check engine” lights flicker on, and you begin to notice that ominous clicking sound from what you think is probably the radiator.
If you’ve spent at least a couple winters in the 49th state, chances are good this has happened to you. You’d like to ignore the warnings, but you know if you don’t get under the hood, the problems with the car are only going to get worse — and more expensive.

Letters – Aug. 12

Rotary helps fulfill education dreams I would like to give an honored and blessed thank you to the Kachemak Bay Rotary Club. I graduated from our beloved Homer High School this spring, and was one of the recipients of The Kachemak Bay Rotary Club Scholarship. I’d like to take this moment to thank everyone who […]

Gov. Walker accepts federal funding to expand Medicaid coverage

A busy July has given way to an active August as the legislative interim continues. July’s major news was Governor Bill Walker’s decision to accept federal funding to expand Medicaid coverage in Alaska. The state estimates about 40,000 uninsured Alaskans will receive coverage, and 4,000 new jobs will be created.
As you probably know, the governor used his power of executive order to accept federal funding for Medicaid expansion as a bill calling for expansion did not advance in the legislature this year.
I believe the governor has made the right decision for Alaska on this issue, and I can tell you the number of constituents who have contacted me in favor of Medicaid expansion far outweighed those opposed.
Also, in a poll we conducted earlier this year through the District P email list, 77 percent of the respondents were in favor of expanding the program.

Highlighting Woodard Creek is a shared cause

Anyone who’s experienced the quiet, shimmering magic of a rippling creek knows what peace of mind it can bring. We forget about the turmoil of life, and clear our minds to think and reflect. The subtle music of gurgling water is a soothing medicine; if you’ve never experienced it, you are missing a treasure. If you have, nature has soaked you in one of its best tonics.
Woodard Creek was once this healing elixir. It was a creek that ran year-round from the bluffs above Homer, through town and into Kachemak Bay. It supplied water and peace of mind for early homesteaders.

Welcome back to the 2015-2016 school year

Our district is very excited to have all of our students, staff and parents back in school. We have had a busy summer at the district office in preparation for this year, and are now able to implement many blended learning opportunities across the district, while leveraging our existing technology for even greater student learning. As you know, we are fully committed to prepare all of our students for their future.
As we continue to prepare our students with many exciting opportunities, a major component involves the opportunity for our teachers to collaborate. This time allows teachers to understand an individual student’s strengths and weaknesses, and work with other teachers to personalize a student’s education. Our teachers work hard to differentiate instruction for content, student interests and student learning profiles. They will use their time wisely to meet each student’s needs.

Letters – Aug. 5

Just say no to spending Since I live out East End Road, beyond the city limits, I don’t have a lot of say about what goes on in the city of Homer. Having said that, however, I just can’t sit by and watch the Homer City Council spend $385,000 to design 35 percent of a […]

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