Seaton sweeps primary

The tempo was upbeat at Alice’s Champagne Palace as supporters of incumbent Rep. Paul Seaton, R-Homer, compulsively hit refresh on the state Division of Elections web site to see the latest updates from the polls.
By 10 p.m., with only 6 precincts reporting, Seaton had more than 50 percent of the vote. Supporters shook hands with the Alaska State House representative, who campaigned on a moderate platform and said his record in Juneau reflected his ability to bridge party lines and be an effective lawmaker.
When all the votes were tallied, Seaton had earned 46.6 percent of the votes, while John Cox, an Anchor Point businessman, took the second-highest vote count with 28.7 percent. Beth Wythe, the outgoing mayor of Homer, received 24.7 percent of the votes.

Zak, Lewis face off in Homer city mayor’s race

Two current council members who have often found themselves on opposite sides of issues will face off for the mayoral seat of Homer this fall. Bryan Zak, a business counselor with Southwest Alaska Small Business Development Center, will face off against David Lewis, a retired teacher and former coordinator of the Kachemak Bay Campus’ Youth Job Training Program.
Both candidates were elected to city council in 2008 and have weathered a variety of issues around the council table, from the legalization of marijuana to the ever-shrinking city budget. The two have disagreed on many issues, including the institution of a bed tax in Homer, which Lewis has long supported, and Zak has summarily opposed.
In his candidate statement, Zak said he believes encouraging involvement in local government is key to the success of the community.

Against odds, fisherman lands huge halibut

It was a slow day on the water for Daniel Spies and the employees of his Soldotna construction company. But that was all about to change as Spies hooked into something that felt like dead weight at first.
“I didn’t know what to think” Spies, a longtime fisherman who placed fourth in the Homer Jackpot Halibut Derby last year with a 187-pound fish. “I couldn’t really tell what it was.”
Spies said at first, he thought maybe his line was stuck on the bottom. Then the mystery fish took off running for a bit and stopped again. Every time he would reel the fish up a bit, it would head right back down to the bottom.
“It was like it was stuck to the bottom with suction cups,” Spies said. “It really didn’t move around a lot.”

Public Safety – August 18

Fire Homer Volunteer Fire Department responded to nine emergency services calls and three fire calls. Anchor Point Fire & EMS responded to six medical calls and three fire calls. Kachemak Emergency Services responded to two fire calls and two EMS calls. Police Monday, Aug 8 1:15 p.m. A female came to the front counter of […]

Satanic invocation opens Borough Assembly meeting

The invocation that started the Kenai Peninsula Borough Assembly’s Tuesday meeting was a little different than usual: Instead of espousing the ideals of Christianity, it carried a message of Satanism.
It was the culmination of recent discussion at the Assembly around whether to keep up with the tradition of opening meetings with prayers, or whether doing so was excluding those who hold different beliefs.
In June, the Assembly discussed an ordinance aimed at doing away with invocations before meetings, but not enough members voted in favor of introducing it.
Instead, the borough has decided to make the reading of invocations more equitable. In the past, said Assembly President Blaine Gilman from Kenai, a group of pastors would usually give the names of members who would give the invocation. Now, it’s on an open, first-come, first-served basis: someone who wants to give an invocation can contact the borough clerk and sign up to do so.

Community news – August 18

SPH adds new radiologist, gynecologist to staff South Peninsula Hospital welcomes new radiologist Edson Knapp, MD, and his wife, gynecologist Renda Knapp, MD, to the hospital’s medical staff and the community. Both doctors received their medical degrees at the University of South Florida, and have practiced medicine in Florida and Tennessee.  Renda is board certified […]

Troopers: Unoccupied trailer was stabbed, spray-painted

The Alaska State Troopers said Saturday they were investigating a trailer stabbing in the community of Anchor Point.
Troopers said in an online report that they responded Friday to a report of a damaged “travel trailer” near North Fork Road.
The responding trooper, Tyler Stuart, said the trailer — the type that’s pulled behind a truck — had two or three punctures about an inch wide. It was also spray-painted with “certain expletives” and sliced, like someone had keyed it, he said.

Oil and gas lease comments wanted

Homer Tribune The federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management will hold hearings on the Kenai Peninsula this week regarding proposed oil and gas leases in the Cook Inlet, and for those who miss the meeting that was to be held Wednesday, the public comment period remains open through Sept. 6. The bureau’s five-year plan proposes […]

Alaska one step closer to expanding Indian Country

The administration of Gov. Bill Walker will begin looking into options and potential ramifications of the federal government taking lands into trust in Alaska, following the announcement Monday morning by state Attorney General Jahna Lindemuth that the state will not pursue any further action in its main court case on the issue.
“I support Attorney General Lindemuth’s conclusion that it doesn’t make sense to use the state’s limited resources pursuing this litigation that has already dragged on for 10 years,” Gov. Walker said in a statement Monday.

Flood control project keeps Fairbanks dry

MOOSE CREEK DAM — For the thirteenth consecutive day, four plates of steel in a framework of concrete have quietly saved Fairbanks.
Heavy rains in the basin of the Chena River, the waterway that spawned Fairbanks, have swelled the river to where motorboats can’t squeeze beneath downtown bridges.
Dam-tenders here have responded by lowering steel gates into the river. The gates skim river water, backing it into an immense channel perpendicular to the river. A 50-foot mound of rock dam reaches eight miles downhill to the larger Tanana River.

Like us on Facebook