Coast guard moves into Mercantile

Coast Guard Marine Safety Detachment Kenai relocated to new offices in Homer last week.
The Coast Guard moved into new offices in the historic Main Street Mercantile, built in 1936, during the first week of April in order to provide greater accessibility to the majority of the Unit’s customers and maintain a valuable connection with the people across the western Kenai Peninsula.
A commissioning ceremony for the new Homer location will be 10:30 a.m. May 3. The Marine Safety Detachment Kenai will be officially renamed Marine Safety Detachment Homer. The public is invited to attend the event.
Marine Safety Detachment Kenai is a six person office responsible for marine casualty investigations, pollution response and marine inspections throughout the western Kenai Peninsula. The move means all six are in the process of moving to Homer to staff the facility. Officer Lt. Sarah Geoffrion said they are excited to be moving to the historic building, and to Homer.

Business Briefs – April 11

IRS Free File available for last-minute filers The tax deadline is fast approaching and even though the April 17 deadline offers a couple of extra days this year, the IRS wants to remind taxpayers who haven’t filed yet that IRS Free File is still available. “For taxpayers who find doing their tax returns too taxing, […]

Business Brief – Dec. 29

Senior housing units open Homer Senior Citizens Inc., celebrated the opening of four new housing units at Swatzell Terrace Tuesday afternoon, adding to the organization’s ability to offer housing to seniors to Homer. The units are already rented, with move-in dates set for Jan. 1. Fred Lau, the former administrator at the center, was able […]

Nancy’s Snack Shack features Old World nuts

Three summers ago, Nancy Niezgocki and her husband were vacationing in Homer from Detroit, Mich. Nancy operates Old World Nuts in Detroit, and couldn’t help but notice a cozy building under construction on the Homer Spit. “I looked at it and thought, ‘that would be perfect for a small business on the Spit,’” she said. […]

Businesses take to the Homer Spit

In a chance conversation on a Paul Banks school field trip, Rick Cline, owner of the Homestead Restaurant, came upon an offer he just couldn’t refuse.
El Pescador owners Jose and Carmen Ramos mentioned to Cline that they were hoping to lease out their restaurant on the Homer Spit this summer. And Cline had just the chef in mind to make it work.

Take a slow boat to Halibut Cove

Imagine a time in the not-too-distant past when “tourism” meant little more than Alaska hospitality. That’s when a tourist was simply invited inside a person’s cabin and offered a cup of tea or taste of smoked salmon.
And once you step in for that cup of tea, expect the stories to last a spell, because few aspects of Alaska life make for a quick yarn.

Restorative yoga: not your usual body twist

To create a pose for “Instant Maui” — a restorative yoga technique — Ramona Pearce places a rolled blanket under her student’s knees.
Resting on a yoga mat covered in a wool blanket, the student reclines at a 90-degree angle on wedges likewise covered. Elbows are aloft to either side of the body, resting on padding. Pearce then sets a scented pillow over the eyes to shut out light.

In the business of moving people around, taxis haul

After 20 years as a Homer taxi driver, Nick Bairamis took on a semi-retired lifestyle this summer. He sold his taxi business, but kept a cab and still works Homer’s streets five nights a week.
Josh Cooper purchased Kostas Taxi – along with four cabs – and currently employs 10 full-time drivers for seven-day-a-week, 24-hour service.
“I had the oldest cab company and I am the oldest cab driver in town,” Bairamis said in his trademark heavy Greek accent.

New shipping trade route opens with Williams Port

Following fuel prices last year that rose to $9.25 per gallon in several remote villages across the Inlet, an arrangement between a small Native corporation and Homer Enterprises allowed this year’s gasoline and heating fuel prices to level off at a more manageable rate.
The villages of Iliamna, Newhalen, Kokhanok, Pedro Bay and Nondalton paid less this winter for fuel, with an adjusted cost of $6.75 for gasoline and $6.50 a gallon for No. 2 fuel in Kokhanak and various prices in the other villages that gave a better break over the previous winter’s costs.

A little more ‘Homer’-land security for KRD

With perimeter security technology and defense system integration already in place around the globe, and military endorsements calling its underground vehicle inspection system the “most sophisticated, cutting-edge gating system we’ve ever seen,” Homer-based Kachemak Research Development, Inc. is beginning to turn a few heads in homeland security circles.

Like us on Facebook