Heidijo looks to raise recording funds

Homer singer/songwriter Heidijo Smith has launched a Kickstarter fundraiser with a goal of reaching $5,000 for a recording session in New Orleans. The clock is now ticking toward a Nov. 27 deadline when the Kickstarter campaign ends.
A series of piano performances for the public begins Friday at AJ’s Oldtown Steakhouse and Tavern. “Sneak a Peek of Heidijo,” is a series of four concerts, continuing Nov. 13, 23 and 27. All shows are from 6-8 p.m. at AJ’s.
Heidijo quickly joined with other performance musicians when she moved to Homer four years ago. She has played at Bunnell Street Arts Center and the Down East Festival this summer. She also was showcased with Johnny B at AJ’s, and with the burlesque shows at Alice’s Champagne Palace.
Heidijo spent much of her life perfecting her musical talents, starting on piano at age 6. Her day job is as a nurse at So

Seth Freeman wraps up Alaska tour in Homer

Guitarist Seth Freeman returns to AJ’s Oldtown Steakhouse at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, where he will play acoustic guitar and sing.
His performance here wraps up an Alaska tour that included the State Fair in Palmer.
Born in Searcy, Ark., Freeman has played guitar since the age of four, taught by his grandfather and father. He also learned from Jim Turner and later Paul Travis, one of the area’s leading instructors, according to promotional information on his website.
In addition to guitar, Freeman plays drums, bass, lap steel, piano, mandolin and dobro. He was voted most talented of his high school class, and has long pursed his dream of making a name for himself in the music industry.

Rock musical closes Pier One season

This weekend Pier One Theatre stages a musical for its final show of the summer, Next to Normal by Brian Yorkey with music by Tom Kitt, directed by Marc Oliver with musical direction by JulieAnn Smith.
As with Andy at the start of the summer season, Pier One closes with a bang, a rock musical in the style of Rent.
The plot, according to Pier One, follows the problems of a suburban family of four, a husband and wife with two teenagers, who are dealing with trying circumstances. The storyline involves the mother’s bipolar disorder, the treatments she goes through and the effects on her family. The cast of six provide a compact and intimate story, backed by a live band of rock instruments and strings. Despite the serious nature of the theme, the story, while moving, also provides some humor. The core of Next to Normal is its reality. The characters are as real as anyone in today’s world and the trials they go through mirror modern day problems to the T.

Get your groove on at KBBI’s Concert on the Lawn

KBBI’s 33rd-annual Concert on the Lawn at Karen Hornaday Park this Saturday and Sunday promises a weekend of varied entertainment with lots of old favorites and a few performers who are new to Homer audiences.
The first concert was staged in 1980.
In addition to the musical action onstage, the popular grass “dance floor” will be necklaced with tents offering arts, crafts, food and more.
Saturday’s line up includes: The Rubber Boot Leggers, Jon Crocker, Dan “Dirty D” Pascucci, JoAnn and Monte, Emma Hill, Red-5, Gary Sloan’s American Music, Nervis Rex and Superfrequency.

JoAnn and Monte return to the stage

For over 30 years JoAnn and Monte entertained with their original music, wit and wisdom but they quit performing for three years and recently assumed important “day jobs” in Homer. Now they are back on stage at AJ’s Oldtown Steakhouse and Tavern at 120 Bunnell on alternate Thursday evenings.
They entertained a full house June 28 and take the stage again July 12 and 26.
“We enjoy our day jobs,” Monte said (he is the Chamber of Commerce Director and JoAnn is Tour Specialist for Alaska Ferry Adventures and Tours). “But music is still our passion.”
They have recorded 11 albums of their music.

Halibut Cove jazz events slated

One of the most artistic towns in the world, Halibut Cove, is hosting two “Jazz in the Cove” events this summer, with proceeds going to support the Homer Foundation.
Tickets are $160 per person and include the ride across Kachemak Bay on either the Danny J or the Stormbird, a seafood dinner prepared by Chef Sean Maryott, a lively jazz performance and the idyllic setting of the Quiet Place Lodge and Halibut Cove.

Music festival christens Down East’s new outdoor stage

Some 25 acts are slated for Down East Saloon’s inaugural music festival this Friday and Saturday, with famous singer Buffy Sainte-Marie highlighting the show on June 30. Opening for her at 8 p.m. Saturday on the new outdoor stage, the Alaska Native band Pamyua will headline Friday night’s show.
Based in Anchorage, Pamyua (pronounced Bum-yo-ah) has national and international shows to their credit, as well as many Alaska performances.
Americans were introduced to Inuit music watching the Canadian epic, “The Fast Runner.” For more than a decade, Pamyua has released traditional Inuit (Yup’ik) drum songs from Alaska, with a distinctly unique American sound. Together for more than 15 years, Pamyua has entertained millions with their fusion of traditional Inuit music and Yup’ik dance performances.

DownEast delivers the music with 2-day festival

A two-day music festival, produced by Milo Matthews who was inspired to bring a brilliant singer/songwriting legend, is coming to Homer June 29-30.
Buffy Sainte-Marie was a graduating college senior in 1962 and hit the ground running in the early 1960s. That was after the beatniks and before the hippies.

Seldovia hosts annual Solstice Music Festival

What do you get when you cross a flat picker, a former Klingon, part of a roller coaster, and a shrew tamer?
You get Seldovia Arts Council’s, walloping 2012 Seldovia Summer Solstice Music Festival.
This year’s headline acts include flatpicking legend, Dan Crary and his band, Thunderation, and James Lee Stanley teaming with Cliff Eberhardt to create All Wood and Doors, an acoustic version of the Door’s greatest hits. They will be joined by 14 solo artists and groups from all over Alaska, who entertain and present workshops over four days in the 12th Annual Seldovia Summer Solstice Music festival June 21-24.
Most events will be at the Susan B. English School.

‘Good Dog’ weds science, music

What happens when a science educator and a music teacher write songs together? The result is “another angle on learning” taken by Good Dog to educate children about marine life.
On Friday, Good Dog is performing “original nature songs aimed at teaching basic ocean literacy” said co-founder Jim Pfeiffenberger.
Good Dog uses scientific accuracy, “one guitar and two voices” to illustrate the adaptations of maritime mammals, birds, and fish.
Trained vocalist Liesl Davenport-Wheeler and Jim Pfeiffenberger formed Good Dog over a dozen years ago in Seward.
Jim currently works at the Ocean Alaska Science and Learning Center. Now a choir teacher at Bartlett High School in Anchorage, Liesl continues to sing as part of Good Dog at events such as Whale Fest Kodiak, the Seattle Folk Festival, and school assemblies around Alaska.
In 2002, they released eleven original songs entitled Tunes from the Tides. The CD prominently features a variety of percussionists, tuba and the naturalistic duo.

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