Country music and poety to entertain Saturday

Local talents will be performing western style music and poetry at Alice’s Champagne Palace at 5 p.m. May 18 at the annual Cowboy Cabaret sponsored by the Kachemak Bay Equestrian Association.
On the program are the Homer Ukulele Society (starring former Homer Mayor Jim Hornaday), the S-Curves (Sunrise Kilcher, Sally Wells, Sue Butler and Sharon Schultz). East End cowboy Mark Marette will be the master of ceremonies.
Other performers just show up, while more are expected to call to be included in the show, according to a key organizer Tim Quinn.

Homer DDF brings home 18 awards

The Homer High Drama, Debate and Forensics Team took 25 participants to the Bartlett High Tournament and swept three first-place awards, along with 15 other wins in a variety of categories.
Johnny Hamilton won first in the Humorous Interpretation category, receiving all first-place votes for the entire tournament. Emmet Meyer took fifth place in the same category.
A big category in high school DDF is the Lincoln Douglas Speaker, and Adi Davis took first in Douglas Speaker Points.
First place in Novice Solo Acting went to Carly McLean, while Drew Turner, Owen Duffy and Neal Wimmerstedt each took third in Reader’s Theater.
Homer swept the Novice Solo competition with, in addition to McLean’s first-place win, third place for Lindsey Schneider, a fourth in Novice Solo Acting for Chloe Loop and fifth in Novice Solo Acting for Louise Tymrak.

Youth present abridged version of ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’

Imagine a single day set aside when hundreds of teens in many schools perform Shakespeare for audiences.
In Homer, that play is “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” with the main performance on Saturday. Homer Council on the Arts and Pier One Theatre teamed up for the production, involving 11 students from 10 to 14 years old, under the direction of Brenda Dolma.
“They are in the ‘tween to teen ages and some of them have done theater or musical theater before,” Dolma said. “Three are new thespians.”
The local program is dubbed Theatre Shakes by HCOA-Pier One as a catchy description. It draws from the goals of the Shakespeare Schools Festival: to bring the enchantment of Shakespeare to young people.

Class looks at motherhood’s ‘muddle’ in ink

Motherhood’s inspiring power can’t help but give spark to yet more creative kindle when it comes to material for the writer’s life in prose.
Yet, the writing outlet isn’t always within reach, given time and demands on mothers engaged in the day-to-day wonders and trials of raising a child.
That’s why a new course carved out by author Miranda Weiss may be particularly timely just as winter gets a foothold. The class grants mothers a space and time of their own. Weiss, author of Tide, Feather, Snow: A Life in Alaska (HarperCollins 2009), is teaching a four-week course 10 a.m. to noon on Saturdays at the R.E.C that will be repeated this winter.

Zimbabwean music/culture video released

Homer residents Doug and Laurel Epps recently released their feature-length documentary about the Cross-Cultural Celebration of Zimbabwean Music they entitled “Soul Resonance,” to the world. During their five-year adventure they traveled all over North America, interviewing over 100 people, including 25 Zimbabweans. They were honored to have noted musician Taj Mahal as their narrator.
Jamie Sutton allowed them to have a premiere showing of their ‘almost-completed’ movie during the Doc Fest at the Homer Theatre in October 2011. They also brought a Zimbabwean musician, Tendai Muparutsa ABD (Doctoral Candidate in Music Education) to Homer.
His arrangement and performance of a traditional Zimbabwean song on marimbas is the opening song of their movie. He taught his music in Cultural Immersion presentations at local schools and to the Zimbabwean marimba ensembles in town.

Homer Council on the Arts hosts Riders in the Sky

Homer Council on the Arts is bringing the well-known and beloved Country and Western performers, Riders in the Sky to Homer tomorrow, Sept. 27. Their performance starts at 7 p.m. at the Homer High School Mariner Theatre. A free performance (thanks to community support for HCOA) is slated that afternoon for elementary students, grades three through six.
According to their website, although CW usually stands for Country and Western, in their case, it’s “comedy and western.”
For more than 30 years, Riders In The Sky have been keepers of the flame, passed on by the Sons of the Pioneers, Gene Autry and Roy Rogers, reviving and revitalizing the genre since 1977.
And while remaining true to the integrity of country and western music, they have become modern-day icons by branding the genre with their own wacky humor and way-out western wit. All along, they encourage young buckaroos and buckarettes to live life “The Cowboy Way.”

This year’s CoastWalk turns up Japanese treasures

Creating art and musical instruments from trash gathered from beaches, the Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies staff and volunteers kicked off their annual Coast Walk (clean up campaign) Thursday with fun, food and education at their headquarters on Smokey Bay Way.
The clean up effort is ongoing with individuals and groups stopping by the office Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.to pick up data cards to document their finds and observations of marinelife, wildlife and shoreline activity, contributing to the research as well as the cleaning of beaches. Of course picking up trash isn’t limited to CACS volunteers. Anyone who treasures planet Earth and her oceans is encouraged to pick up trash every time they take a walk. Earthlings are also urged not to clutter their planet with trash in the first place.

Documentary Film Fest offers colorful cultural perspectives

Nine films usher in the 9th Annual Homer International Documentary Film Festival at the historic Homer Theatre, the longest running movie house in Alaska.
This year’s festival will mark the second year of Digital Film in Homer with PINA: 3-D, a dancing spectacle which has won Best Documentary at various European Film Festivals.
The Gala opening Thursday will feature Marley, the story of the reggae legend Bob Marley featuring never-before-seen historical footage and inspiring music. Audiences across the nation have been raving about this soul-moving documentary. Following the film, there will be a live reggae concert by a local, six-piece band, Uplift.
Mac Sutton, son of Homer Theatre owner Jamie Sutton, said when the films are screened, they keep Homer audiences in mind for its interest in art, music and social commentary. The eventual winner of the Academy Awards for Best Documentary has been presented at each of the previous Homer festivals. Each of these films won Sundance, Tribeca, Berlin Film Festival and or other awards.

Muller fired up for ninth-annual basket burning

For the ninth consecutive year, artist Mavis Muller is out on the beach at Mariner Park, braving winds, rain and occasional kite surfers who hit the surf at the base of the Homer Spit, as she constructs a large, intricately woven basket of natural materials.
Construction of the basket, as well as a walking labyrinth, began Sunday and continues through Sept. 15. The actual burning of Muller’s impermanent art project is slated for Sept. 16.

Wooden Boat Festival provides variety of entertainment

The Kachemak Bay Wooden Boat Society is staging its 20th annual Wooden Boat Festival Sept. 6-9 primarily behind the Pier One Theatre on the Homer Spit.
The fun starts Thursday at the Salty Dawg Saloon with sea chanteys, tall tales and fisher poets at 7 p.m.
At 10 a.m., noon and 2 p.m. Friday, Saturday and Sunday, Gart Curtis’ ex-navy motor whaleboat Pyro, (named for the U.S. Navy ammunition carrier the USS Pyro) will be giving harbor tours. Mako Haggerty will be presenting the tours. Check in with Mako’s Water Taxi above ramp 2 in Homer Harbor. Tickets are $10. Call 235-9055 for reservations.
Then Friday, movies and speakers will entertain at the Alaska Islands and Ocean Visitor Center.

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