Library to host ‘Liberty and Justice (For All)’ Art exhibit, events

Photo by Benjamin J. Spatz An excited Liberian woman casts her presidential ballot in 2005. The photo is one of several included in the “Liberty and Justice (For All)” exhibit.

Photo by Benjamin J. Spatz
An excited Liberian woman casts her presidential ballot in 2005. The photo is one of several included in the “Liberty and Justice (For All)” exhibit.

The Homer Public Library will take part in January’s First Friday event with a 5-7 p.m. opening of the “Liberty and Justice (For All)” exhibit.
A video of the opening panel discussion at the VII Gallery in New York, first aired on Alaska Public TV — 360 North, will play in the conference room during that time. The Spring 2012 issue of Alaska Quarterly Review featured a special photo and text feature entitled “Liberty and Justice (For All).”
In this special tribute section to Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros, two photojournalists tragically killed in 2011 while covering the civil war in Libya, 68 of the world’s leading photojournalists explore the universal themes of liberty and justice through images and personal narratives.
Taken together, the photographers’ words and images create a tapestry of the varied nature of liberty and justice that coalesce to explore something even more fundamental: the pursuit and importance of truth.
The Friends of the Homer Public Library will host two events during the month: A discussion of human rights and individual responsibilities takes place at 6 p.m. on Jan. 14, in the library’s fireplace reading lounge.
Ghandi wrote, “I learned from my illiterate but wise mother that all rights to be deserved and preserved came from duty well-done. Thus the very right to live accrues to us only when we do the duty of citizenship of the world. From this one fundamental statement, perhaps it is easy enough to define the duties of Man and Woman and correlate every right to some corresponding duty to be first performed.”
Topics will include: the rights of a democratic government balanced by duties as citizens; the rights of freedom of speech balanced by the hope of reasoned discourse and personal integrity, and the rights of protest balanced by the responsibility of engagement within the current system.
On Jan. 21 at 6 p.m., seniors from Homer High School advanced placement English class will give brief persuasive essays they’ve written. The winning essayist will receive a $200 prize. Call the Homer Public Library at 491-1001 for more information.

Contact the writer
Posted by on Dec 18th, 2013 and filed under Arts, Events, Feature. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

Comments are closed

Like us on Facebook