Take the trolley to First Friday shows

By Randi Somers
Homer Tribune

Native Alaskan Art at Bunnell

Native Alaskan Art at Bunnell

A “first” for First Friday, the Homer Trolley will make the rounds of the art galleries several times Friday evening, looping the scene every 15 minutes to the art openings until 7:30 p.m. Starting at the Bunnell Street Art Center at 5:15 p.m., stops include the Homer Council on the Arts, Art Shop Gallery, Picture Alaska (from there it’s an easy stroll across the street to Ptarmigan and Fireweed) and Jars of Clay Pottery. An evening pass is $8.
Another new feature this Friday, Old Songs Productions is staging  a show at Alice’s Champagne Palace, “a special edgy version.” After this Friday, their skits will be performed Wednesday evenings.
Bunnell Street Art Gallery will be featuring several native Alaska artists’ creations. Curator Michael Walsh gathers works of life-long Alaskans, indigenous and not, for a diverse show exploring what makes a person an Alaskan. Featured artists include Sonya Kelliher Combs, Carla Klinker Cope, Tehben Dean, Rachelle Dowdy, Elizabeth Ellis, Asia Freeman, Hal Gage, Mariano Gonzales, Michael Gerace, Ruby Kennell, Drew Michael, Jennifer Norton, Evan Phillips, Jimmy Riordan, Ryan Romer, Gretchen Sagan, Ron Senugetuk, Ricky Tabagan and Ethan Wood. (Cope, Dean, Freeman, Norton, Riordan and Senungetuk are locals) Artist/curators’ talk is Friday evening at 6 p.m. Following the talks, Wild Shore Music Festival’s Resident Ensemble TRANSIT performs  at 7:30.

Noyles art at Picture Alaska

Noyles art at Picture Alaska

Bunnell welcomes Homer-grown New York-based composer, Conrad Winslow as Artist-in-Residence in July for this performance of new chamber music.  TRANSIT seeks to create bridges between and among various styles of music being written and performed today. Tickets for this performance are $15 to $25 (pay as you can.)
The Pratt Museum is featuring Encounters: Whales in Our Waters, which closes after July 21. Through film, photos and recordings, the show explores marine mammals that frequent Kachemak Bay and looks at how people of the region relate to them. Other galleries and the store are also open from 5-7 p.m. for First Friday. Admission is free for this special.
The Art Shop Gallery hosts Anchorage glass jewelry maker Liz Bowen. She will continue her show on Saturday from 1-6 p.m. She draws her inspiration from the beauty of Alaska, the native art of the southeast and the animals she encounters living here. She has been designing and making glass jewelry since 1988, created from semi-precious metal-coated glass. The glass can have as many as 20 layers of the metals like beryllium, titanium and yitrium. Since these metals are often found in glacier tailings, she calls her jewelry  Glacier Glass.
Dramatic mountain photography gets main stage attention at Homer Council on the Arts with Tom Reed’s book “Moved by a Mountain.” The collection‘s  panoramic views and poetic descriptions were inspired by the scenes surrounding his cabin, which faces Dixon Glacier, the mountains and other inspiring views.
As the sun, clouds and fog constantly alter the artistry,  he photographs the changing scene at various times to capture special lighting, sometimes in the evening when the sun was low in the sky and sometimes when the full moon was rising over a mountain scene he calls “The Throne Room.” Accompanying  his photos are quotes from philosophers and poets as well as his own philosophical observations.
Reed is a geographer by education at Rutgers University, a wilderness photographer and author who has worked as a surveyor in Alaska, a river guide in the western U.S. and Alaska. He is also a sailor, fisherman, somatic therapist, carpenter and martial artist. He currently works as a hypnotherapist.

The Fireweed Gallery features Kasilof artist Rebecca Middleton Hinsberger.
Hinsberger’s show represents her transition from watercolor to oil, a change which began after receiving her Bachelor of Arts degree in 2007. She found her calling early in life. At age 16, she spent a year in Paris studying at a private charcoal life drawing atelier, and evenings at the Louvre Museum.
After 20-plus years, Hinsberger began transitioning into oils. In her  paintings, she strives to convey a lively surface of hue and energy,  allowing bold colors and shapes to create the foundation of her compositions

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Posted by on Jul 2nd, 2013 and filed under Arts. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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