Otter pup rescued from Kachemak Bay Drive

• Why did the otter cross the road? Likely in search of its Mom
By Naomi Klouda
Homer Tribune

Photo by Martin Renner - An otter pup lays in the grass after being found on Kachemak Drive. The female is believed to be between 6-8 weeks old.

Photo by Martin Renner - An otter pup lays in the grass after being found on Kachemak Drive. The female is believed to be between 6-8 weeks old.

A baby female sea otter was rescued from Kachemak Drive on Wednesday after it crawled out of Mud Bay on a high tide and motorists found it on the road.
The otter, about 18 inches in length, had apparently become separated from its mother, said Debbie Boege-Tobin, an assistant professor of biology with the UAA Kenai Peninsula College Kachemak Bay Campus. She was in the middle of administering a chemistry test for students at KBC when her phone began to ring.
“After about 12 calls, I thought ‘I need to answer this,’” Boege-Tobin said. Dean Sundmark from Student Services stood by overseeing testing of the students while she responded to the stranded otter.
Boege-Tobin is a marine mammal stranding volunteer in addition to conducting the college’s Semester By the Bay program, which brings students to Homer for a semester from other colleges around the country to experience hands-on marine research studies.
“Since otters are typically born in spring-summer, I assumed this would likely be a four-plus month old, and therefore recruited Martin Renner, KBC Ornithology Adjunct Instructor, to assist,” Boege-Tobin said. “When Martin and I arrived on the scene, Lisa Zatz was on site making sure the otter remained safe until someone arrived to assess its condition.  I noticed it was quite small/young, likely two months old or so, didn’t appear to have any obvious injuries, but was very lethargic.” 
Before placing the otter into the kennel, Boege-Tobin assessed its external condition for possible injuries, but didn’t find any apparent problem. She also didn’t get too much of a response. But by the end of the transition, the pup woke up fully and began calling loudly and repeatedly.
“We placed the kennel next to the water’s edge in Mud Bay for awhile in hopes it would call in the mother.  Unfortunately, once again we did not observe or hear any sea otters whatsoever in the area,” Boege-Tobin said. “It’s tough out there for an otter to survive without it’s mother. Otter mothers do a lot of intense training to prepare them for life at sea.” Since the mother couldn’t be located, it means the otter will grow up in aquariums.
Two stranding network volunteers, Mark Tanski, KBC student, and Jennifer Rasche, KBC Registration Specialist, drove the screaming pup up to Soldotna where they met the ASLC rescue team. 

Photo by Monica Cooper - A volunteer feeds the otter pup at the Alaska Sealife Center.

Photo by Monica Cooper - A volunteer feeds the otter pup at the Alaska Sealife Center.

“Other than being in a cold (you have to keep it cold for the otter) SUV with an otter pup who screamed the entire time, Mark and Jenny made it safely back to Homer and the otter pup made it to the ASLC,” Boege-Tobin said.
At the Alaska Sealife Center, the otter was placed in a new unit called the I.Sea.U, a play on intensive care unit. The center reports the otter pup is doing well, “eating 35 percent of her body weight daily from a bottle, and interacting with enrichment items.”
The otter is between 6 and 8 weeks old and weighs a mere 8 pounds.
The I.Sea.U was designed for sea otters. But its first residents were two walrus calves recently transported to their new homes at the New York Aquarium and the Indianapolis Zoo on Oct. 10. After a quick reconfiguration on Wednesday, the new animal care space was transformed into a sea otter nursery that can be viewed by visitors to the Center through one-way windows. The USFWS will determine the otter’s permanent home. The otter’s stay at the Center is expected to be short. Alaskans wishing to see the otter are encouraged to visit before the end of October, according to their report on I.Sea.U.
“This truly was a community effort,” Boege-Tobin wrote in an email. Several came out to block or redirect traffic when the otter was in the road, many students, faculty and staff came out while at KBC to check on the pup and even airport safety came by on several occasions to ask if help were needed.

Contact the writer
Posted by on Oct 24th, 2012 and filed under Headline News. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

Comments are closed

Like us on Facebook