Music fest: Soak up the sounds of Seldovia’s summer

Seldovia Music Fest starts on Tusty

Thunderation

Thunderation

The Seldovia Arts Council’s 12th-annual Summer Solstice Music Festival is this weekend, and the celebration begins with a singalong jam during the ride across the Bay Thursday aboard the Tustumena. The ferry leaves the Homer dock around 11 a.m.
In addition to onstage performances by national, international and local performers — including headliners James Lee Stanley and Cliff Eberhardt, Dan Crary and Thunderation — the festival offers music-related workshops, a gospel jam and dancing, open mic, yoga, feasts, songwriters’ circle and more.
Performers include Rant and Raven Morris Dancers, Dawn Berg, Chris Berg, Lyn Lemon, Joanne Teague, Karin Gustafson, Serena Coons, Dan Coons and Donna Levesque Rick Brooks, Robin Hopper, Eric Braendel, Ken Sease, Tom Begich, Dan McElrath, Milo Mathews, The Cindy McKenna Band, Hurricane Dave Rush, Angela Lotsitz and Lee Petku and locals “Billy Goat Simone D’Biblioteque.”

Got that Reggae beat?

Bare Roots Reggae

Bare Roots Reggae

The Alibi on Pioneer Avenue has booked Bare Roots Reggae to entertain on Saturday night.
Making music since December 2008, the band features Koka Gionson on vocals and ukulele, James Burton and Dan Burton, guitar and vocals, Eric Burton on bass and Joshua Anaya on drums.
Gionson has performed in various reggae bands in both Hawaii and Alaska. Brothers James and Dan Burton have played music for 20 years in various genres including metal, jazz, bluegrass and reggae. Dan plays both guitar and drums.
Eric Burton is a music major at UAA Anchorage and he has also been playing music most of his life.
Joshua Anaya boasts a varied background playing jazz, metal and latin rhythms. Band members say they look forward to expanding their reggae fusion sound by incorporating some elements of those genres.
Bare Roots also plays the Alibi July 21 and Aug. 25.
A few weeks ago, the Alibi separated their dining room from the bar so all ages can dine there. They have added an outdoor dining area and an expanded menu for dining in or taking out. It includes Mexican style food; burritos, tacos, quesadillas and enchiladas.

How to assemble a whale

Gray whale

Gray whale

Whale skeleton articulation expert Lee Post is seeking volunteers to help assemble a gray whale skeleton from a collection of bones now resting in the bottom level of the Pratt Museum.
This Pratt community project is coordinated by Mary Maly. Interested participants can contact her at the museum, or e-mail Post at boneman@xyz.net. He hopes to start the project no later than July 1 if enough volunteers sign up.
This whale was one of some 283 dead whales that washed ashore on the west coast in 1999. Post said this one washed up in Halibut Cove.
In 2000, some 368 whales were found on west coast beaches. After the two high mortality years, the number of deaths dropped back to 21 in 2001. Post said scientists still seek the cause of the spike in deaths.
Since this whale washed ashore and was butchered, the bones have been curing under water and in the sun. The Pratt is shooting for completion by February 2013, when they plan to mount a major exhibition depicting the relationship between whales and humans.
Post, who is one of the owners of the Homer Book Store, says that is his day job but articulating whales is his passion. He did his first one in Port Townsend Wash, has assembled three in Kodiak and one in Mexico for a total of 15.
Post gave a presentation to a large group of people at the Pratt Saturday afternoon. Many signed up to help on the spot.

Hear ‘Blue Rose’ at Bunnell

Blue Rose Trio

Blue Rose Trio

Alaska clarinetist on the UAA Music Faculty, Karl Pasch, joins Wisconsin native Lars Hoefs, and Taiwanese export Rose Chen for Blue Rose Trio, coached by Chamber Music America founder and former Lenox Quartet first violinist Peter Marsh. 
The Blue Rose Trio, featuring  piano, cello and clarinet is one of today’s most exciting young ensembles, engaging a diverse public with an uncanny marriage of visceral energy and deep sensitivity. Their performances have thrilled audiences in Brazil, China, France, Israel, Alaska, Texas and California.
Tickets are $25 at Bunnell. Pay as you can.

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Posted by on Jun 20th, 2012 and filed under Arts. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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