Alaska’s fashion innovation shines true in Homer

By Naomi Klouda

A poll in Travel Plus Leisure Magazine found Anchorage residents placed first in the worst-dressed, or least-fashionable, of 33 cities in America.
The best gurus of fashion, according to the poll, live in New York City.
We don’t care. If they really want to see fashion, they should come to Homer. People who value Gucci and Vivisaint, as a sign of good taste, don’t possess the same values as us. Still, wouldn’t it be a plus to show off our unique brand of fashion sense?

Eve Matkin, Libby Veasey and Maddie Fuller give an illustration of the freedom known in Homer, and probably Alaska, to fully express themselves with clothes (ABOVE, RIGHT). In the end, no article is prohibited from being at the occasion simply because of its class as dress-up or work or what-have-you.


There are not many clothing snobs among us. There are lots of ways to make fashion statements such as: I’m heading home to sit on my couch and eat ice cream. I won’t take my coat off – ever, is another.
An ordinary trip to the grocery store offers all the proof needed. One young man wore a pair of pants with his camouflaged-patterned shorts on top. See the possibilities there? If it warms up, he takes off the first layer. If it’s breezy out, well, he’s got both. A lady at the store demonstrated brown XtraTuf boots contrasted cheekily with a skirt whose hem ended at her knees. She’s ready to dance after a beach walk.
And the hats – they should see our hats. Women show up in the brightest woolen creations, multicolored hats, broad headbands swarming in fuchsia and purple and lime green. Since Homer women generally opt out of dying their hair to cover the gray, the hats take on all kinds of significance. I’m having fun at 50, they shout. Sixty is the new sexy, a spunky pink one gushes. For that matter, our accessorizing skills are perhaps outstanding. Who could fault us on our endless varieties of earrings.
Why segregate clothes? These for work, these for play, these for dress up – it’s all the same. Here’s a case on Bishop’s Beach where the dress-up things are mixed with play clothes: a short-skirted dress trimmed in a lacy banner over leggings and boots. Fleece jacket, hair done up in a stocking hat. Wouldn’t be fair to ban a cute dress from a trip to the beach, would it?
Today, I’ve got on a sweater that came as a hand-me-down from my daughter. I’ve got Levi’s on because it’s Friday, and men’s shoes because they are more comfortable for walking and fit in my Dr. Scholls. Out in the car, I’ve got a skirt in a bag and my XtraTuf boots – never know what a news day might call for. One thing I will never again get stuck doing is wearing high heels on a Coast Guard Cutter.
Who says we don’t have fashion? It’s just not conventional. The truth-test clothing must stand up to is whether it’s comfortable. Does it express us? Is it fun? Heck, is it functional? We don’t tend to be impressed by price tags and name brands.
Did you hear about the prom dresses and the clothing exchange collection going on at the REC Room? It’s a revolving system whereby teens can find a new sweat shirt, or a formal gown if one is required. Who needs to dress shiny new? See, we’re passing on our values.
Eve Matkin, Libby Veasey and Maddie Fuller give an illustration of the freedom known in Homer, and probably Alaska, to fully express themselves with clothes (ABOVE, RIGHT). In the end, no article is prohibited from being at the occasion simply because of its class as dress-up or work or what-have-you.
New York designers should come to Homer to see a possibility for the fashion of the future.

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Posted by on Jun 6th, 2012 and filed under Editorial, Financial Focus, Opinion. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

1 Response for “Alaska’s fashion innovation shines true in Homer”

  1. kathy says:

    hi naomi,
    love the article, let them keep their hyped up fashion, we’re happy with our flip flops to work or rubber boots for fishcamp after work. hope your happy and well :-)

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